TexasDirector

News

  • 01 Dec 2016 2:38 PM | Carrie Casey (Administrator)

    I had said about a month ago that I would talk a bit about my mother-in-law’s terminal diagnosis.  She has pancreatic cancer.  We are piling up memories.  Making sure that the younger grandchildren have time with her is a high priority.  Both my husband and I are able to offer support and BE THERE.  Not everyone can.

    Cancer, unfortunately, is a fairly common affliction. Chances are good that you’ll eventually know someone who’s fighting their way through the disease. It may be a child at your center, a staff member or a person in your personal life. Avoid being that friend who doesn’t come around or call when someone you know is dealing with serious illness. Step up to be the one your friend or loved one can count on to help.

    Consider these ways to help a loved one fight one of the toughest battles of their life:

    1. State, “I’m here to help you.” Then, mean it. Be definite and specific since a person with cancer needs people who will push forward and help them get the daily things done so they can rest and recuperate from chemotherapy and radiation treatments if they are going through treatment.  If they aren’t currently having treatment, they will still need help.
    2. Rather than ask what you can do, say what you will Be specific. “I can pick up your kids from school on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays while you’re getting chemotherapy. They can stay at the center and play with my kids until you get home. Will that work for you?”
    3. Cook dinner for your friend and their family every week. Make lasagna and buy a bag of salad and drop it off. Brew a big pot of soup and take it over. Make a Crockpot full of pulled pork, buy coleslaw at your local deli, and drop them off with fresh buns for quick sandwiches.
    • Providing nourishment and pre-made meals for your cancer-fighting friend can be the most loving thing to do for them and their family members. 
    • Be aware that they will probably have a smaller appetite than usual while undergoing treatment.
    1. Take them to therapy. One of the scariest parts of dealing with cancer is undergoing chemotherapy or radiation. It can be a 3- or 4-hour session at the cancer treatment center followed by them getting a contraption strapped on that has an I.V. connected to it that continues to deliver more medication over the next few days.  Don’t feel you have to talk the who time.  Being comfortable sitting with someone in silence is golden.
    • Transporting to and from these sessions can be so helpful for family members that are overloaded with the stress of dealing with the disease on a day-to-day basis. Plus, family members often must continue to work to bring money into the household and can’t be available every day to transport.
    1. Ask when the best time is for them to receive calls. Keep in mind that your loved one who has cancer feels very tired and will be trying to nap and rejuvenate as much as possible. Make arrangements for when you’ll call so it won’t disturb them. You could also ask them to text or call you when they feel like talking.  When you are there pay attention to their cues, and cut the visit short if they are in pain or tired.  I know you miss spending time with them, but they may not be up to it for as long as you are.
    2. Be sensitive and understanding. If you’ve ever needed to be aware of someone’s feelings, it’s when a friend is coping with cancer. Your friend might be feeling cranky and annoyed. Or they might be crying and depressed.
    • Sometimes, if you just listen and acknowledge that their reactions are normal and they’re entitled to their feelings, it’s all that’s necessary to lend support.
    • Find something you can do with them that helps them feel like their old self.  For my mother-in-law it is flowers and gardening.  Is there a way to create a small way to bring that back into their life?
    1. Deal appropriately with your own feelings first. You might be feeling pretty devastated about the news that your loved one has cancer. Allow yourself to cry about it with your spouse or another friend before you talk with your sick friend. The image I used for this blog is the ring theory of grief.  When you are in pain you want to express that pain to others who are affected.  The key element is to share with people in the same circle or those further out.  Don’t go inward, they are dealing with it on more levels than you are.  If the people in the middle want to talk with you- fine.  Otherwise, share outward.
    • Lean on your journal to help you process your feelings and work to accept what’s happening regarding your loved one’s health. Giving yourself a day or two to adjust to the news before speaking to the friend with cancer (if possible) will help you focus more on how they’re feeling and what they’re going through.
    1. Make a consistent effort to take a positive approach. The fact is that many people survive cancer these days. Tell her you’re proud of how she’s handling the whole thing. Acknowledge how she continues to do whatever is necessary to cope with her illness. The more positive energy you can bring to her, the better she’ll fare through her recovery.

    Do what you can to be a consistent, strong support to a loved one fighting cancer. You’ll be so glad you did.

    Subscribe to this blog, to keep up with what is going on here.  We cover different topics that relate to directing child care centers.


  • 28 Nov 2016 2:53 PM | Carrie Casey (Administrator)

    Being a Director almost always also means being the marketing department.  I have just finished my first ever time to run promotions for Black Friday, Small Business Saturday, Cyber Monday, etc.  We have had them before.  I just wasn’t in charge of them.  I am not at all sure I did it well.  But I did it and that is a thing to be proud of.

    Being a Director means I have to do things I am not 100% comfortable doing.  I remember the first time I got in front of a tv camera.  I was SWEATING!  But it was free publicity for my business and they wanted to talk to someone with skin in the game.  I was very excited that they called me.  I had been courting the station to some degree for a few months: watching as many news shows as I could and sending in email comments about news items that related to my business.  My childcare center was downtown, so it wasn’t hard to find things that were relevant.  Anything that had to do with downtown, children or families was liable to get a quick note from me.  This was well over a decade ago, so they weren’t as swamped by email as they are now.  I stood out, so I got a call and people heard about my center.

    How do we stand out in today’s market?  Sending an email is unlikely to do it.  We all get far too many to count now.  We need clients to know we are here and are relevant.  We can advertise.  Lord knows, I do.  Everybody does.  How much do you believe in the ad copy you read or hear every day?  10%?  You may be conveying 100% true information, but people filter it out.  Marketing is more than buying a well executed google ad.  It is getting in front of people in different settings, so your customers start to know like and trust you.

    How do you position your self as a knowledgable and likable person?  Getting on the local news might still be a good way to get noticed, but how do you get the news to notice you?   I have had some success with hand written notes.  They are the rarity now that email was back in the dark ages.  Tweeting images also has some traction.  You have to engage with them, build a relationship.

    Texas Director helps a lot of my centers get into the paper.  Local papers need local content to stay relevant.  Having a great event that highlights a worthy cause or brings in dignitaries, is the key strategy there.  The images you send also play a central role.  Make sure you send both portrait and landscape pictures, because you never know what space they need to fill.  Believe me pictures of cute kids sell!  Your write up of the event should be as close to newspaper copy as you can make it.  The less work the editor or beat reporter has to do, the more likely you are to get in the paper.

  • 22 Nov 2016 10:56 PM | Carrie Casey (Administrator)


    I have been blessed to be able to work in early childhood education for more than 25 years.  I started off as an assistant in a lab school and have had pretty much every job available in center.  Amazing!

    How many people get to earn their living in something that makes such a difference in the world?  Here at Texas Director we help men and women develop their leadership talents so that they can help hundreds of children.  Hundreds of children touched by each Director, and we have helped thousands of Directors. If you do the math, that means that hundreds of thousands of families have been affected by what I do.   SoI want to thank you for allowing me to help you.  The scope of what we do amazes me.

    What you do each day is so important.  You are shaping the populace of tomorrow.  How you run your center affects how the families view their community.  The tenor of your classrooms sets the children up to be the best versions of themselves.  You help your staff be able to do their often stressful jobs with enthusiasm and skill.  You are a resource in your community.  How amazing!

    It is difficult to remember to be thankful for what we get to do on a daily basis.  Sometimes, when there is a stomach flu wreaking havoc in the twos class, there doesn't feel like there is much to be thankful for.  But remember when little Jaime brought you the picture he drew just for you?  Not many engineers have that happen on a Thursday.  What about when a teacher brought you a snack because they thought you could use it?  What a gift to work with such caring people!  

    Take time today to think about what you are most thankful for in your job.  Writing down one thing you are thankful for on the calendar before you leave for the day, is a great way to catch those moments.  I bet there was one today.   Share it in the forums, to inspire other Directors.  

  • 15 Nov 2016 10:15 PM | Carrie Casey (Administrator)


    As life throws a challenge my way, I respond positively to avoid feeling stressed. My response to tough situations is to engage my creativity.

    When I take a time out to create something new, I feel like I am replacing negative energy with positivity. Inspired activities allow me to dig deep into my soul for a light that brightens the world.

    Writing soothes my emotional burdens and releases my tensions.

    My words both acknowledge and empower me. Being honest about my feelings is the first step to releasing their weight from my being. I follow up those open and honest words with words of empowerment and resolve. This is my creative process.

    Although my singing voice leaves much to be desired, I sing anyway. Expressing myself through song lifts my spirit. The lyrics and melodies that I write are therapeutic.

    My creativity pulls me out of the darkness and renews my spirit.

    My artistry is a blessing. It builds me from the inside out. It fortifies my core to defend against any challenge in life.

    Today, I am blessed because I know the value of my creativity. My difficult situations are more manageable today because I spend time being imaginative. Being transported to another world through inspiration gives me a chance to rebuild.

    Self-Reflection Questions:

    • 1.    How else, other than through art, can I exercise my creativity?
    • 2.    In what other ways am I able to alleviate stress?
    • 3.    What value do I place on creativity?


    PDF version of this affirmation available


  • 14 Nov 2016 1:34 PM | Carrie Casey (Administrator)


    Being a Director is stressful.  We all have days that are considerably more challenging and stressful than others. Unfortunately, stress is hard on both your mind and body.

    Too many high stress days can really take its toll. And what’s worse, you could even become so used to being in this “high state of alert” that you start to feel like it’s normal! Don’t let this happen to you.  Your family and center need you.  More than that you should take care of yourself, before you take care of others.

    It’s important to develop some techniques that help you relieve stress and strengthen your self-soothing abilities.

    When you're struggling to stay calm, relaxed, and focused, try some of these strategies:

    1.     Breathe deeply. Breathe in for 5 seconds and hold it for 5 seconds. Now exhale for 5 seconds. Do this 10 times and focus only on your breathing. These breaths should only be slightly larger in volume than a normal, relaxed breath.

    2.     Take a walk. Practice the breathing technique above during your walk, focusing on your breathing, walking, and surroundings. Nothing else should enter your mind. If your mind insists on wandering to non-productive thinking, you might have to simply keep repeating, "Taking a step" to yourself over and over.

    3.     Get some exercise. Any time of day is a good time to exercise. Comfortably tired is what you're looking for. Work out your frustrations by going for a run or swim. Hit the weights and show them who is boss. Any exercise will do as long as there is some intensity involved. Shuffleboard isn't going to cut it.

    4.     Sit outside. A little time at the beach or park can work wonders. Find a relaxing spot with pleasant scenery. Pay attention to what's going on around you and keep your mind off your challenges. Even 10 to 15 minutes can greatly reduce your stress.

    5.     Take a day off. Everyone needs a break once in a while. However, on your day off, it’s important to avoid just sitting around and brooding about all of your current difficulties. Take your mind off of things and have some fun. Lose yourself in activities that you enjoy.

    6.     Read. Find something engrossing to read. The ideal book would be able to take your mind off of things for a few hours. Ask your friends for some recommendations, or if you're like most people, you probably have a couple of books on the shelf that you've never gotten around to. Now is the perfect time to read it.

    7.     Listen to music. Again, it should be something engrossing that really captures your attention. Don't be afraid to get up and dance; no one is watching anyway.

    8.     Disconnect. No phone and no computer. Turn off everything that connects you to the outside world. Then you can really relax. Stay offline for as long as you can.

    9.     Take a nap. There's no better way to start over than to take a nap. When you wake up, it feels like another chance to start your day over. What happened before your nap is in the past! Now you can deal with it and move on.

    10.  Hang out with people that are fun. Get the gang together and meet for a drink. Or have dinner with the friend that always makes you laugh. It's easy to get caught up in our own little world. Being with others can jolt you out of that perspective.

    Don't let high stress get you down. The key is to actively do something about it. Some people develop a habit of being paralyzed when things start going sideways, but this does nothing to make you feel better or solve your stressful issues.

    Actively relax so you’ll be better able to tackle your challenges. Use these tips to minimize the pressure and anxiety you're feeling and take control of yourself and the situation. Dealing with your challenges effectively is crucial to living the peaceful life you deserve.

    We will be putting out a complete Stress Management Workshop very soon.  Enter your information below to get updates about this class and periodic stress management tips.

    Get Stress Management Information

    * indicates required


  • 13 Nov 2016 1:30 PM | Carrie Casey (Administrator)

     

    As a Director, you have a hard job managing your child care center.  I know the drill.  It is hard and there is more than any one person can do well.  That is where Texas Director comes in.  We offer you a helping hand where and when you need it.

    One of the ways we will be doing that in 2017 is to create new products for you and your center.  We currently offer business coaching, onsite training for your staff, business plan development assistance and substitute directing services.  This is not enough.  We need to do more.  You need more help.  But what areas are your biggest challenges?  Kate and I have theories, and you have answers.

    To make sure that we are creating is what you want and need, we have created a short survey.

    Please take a moment to ask for what you want.  Each survey is also an entry into a drawing for 15 different prizes.  Prizes include a free message, an MP3 player, 20 free hours of training, and many other prizes.  Enter TODAY. Survey closes on November 19, 2016.

    survey

    https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/TCSV958


  • 31 Oct 2016 2:42 PM | Carrie Casey (Administrator)


    Most of you know that the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services, licensing, update Minimum Standards recently.  Since it was just a 2 page update, many people have more or less ignored it.  There are, however, several significant changes to the training requirements for both pre-service and on-going professional development requirements.  These do impact your program immediately and we don't want you to be blindsided.

    Carrie broke these down on a recent Facebook training.  Take a look and get 15 minutes of training at the same time.

    https://www.facebook.com/texasdirector/videos/10155295333259460/

  • 16 Oct 2016 4:32 PM | Carrie Casey (Administrator)

    Do you wake up each day excited at the prospect of going to work? Do you feel fortunate to have such wonderful employment and coworkers? Does your career provides you with spiritual abundance and freedom?  Does the passion for your career overflow every day, and inspire others?

    Do you expect the best for your job and yourself? Are you considered an expert in your field and enjoy the perks and benefits that go along with that positive reputation? Is your pay is appropriate for your level of expertise?

    Is your company thriving and providing you with challenge and inspiration? Do you feel grateful to be part of such a wonderful organization? Do you feel at home when working?

    Is your boss is supportive of employee advancement and good at giving feedback the staff need in order to excel? Do you spend every night reflecting on how fortunate you am to have my career?

    This is what I want for you in your career. I want you to plan to be your very best at work. I want you to be excited at the opportunities that your career presents and be committed to making the most of it. You have so many reasons to love your career if you are in the right one.  Take a minute to look at your current career track and appreciate what is great about it.  Also look at what needs to improve and make a plan to address it.

    Self-Reflection Questions:

    1. What would I change about my career?
    2. How has my career improved over the last year?
    3. What do I enjoy the most about my career?
    4. What needs to change?
    5. What steps can I take to improve it?

    If you are looking to take a different direction in you teaching career, Texas Director is here for you.  We can help you transition into a director or trainer role.  We also consult with folks who are looking to move into ownership.  Email Carrie@TexasDirector.org for a free session to start putting together your plan.

  • 13 Oct 2016 9:30 AM | Carrie Casey (Administrator)


    Enrollment in childcare is predictable.  When you are sitting in the hot seat it doesn’t feel that way.  I often felt like there was some incomprehensible force moving the families to surge into and dribble out of my centers.  If you have felt this confusion, I am here to help!

    Primary Shift

    When school is about to start in your area, or has just started is your best chance at a fully enrolled school.  Parents think about enrolling at this time of year.

    Many have been planning this for months and toured centers months before honing their search criteria and evaluating the prospects.  They came by in March, toured, and dropped off your radar. Then in August they show back up with the forms you gave them earlier in the year filled out, ready to start.  What?  I don’t have room for another 4 year old girl in Ms. Melissa’s class.  Has this ever happened to you?

    Other families seem oblivious to the concept of touring and evaluating and simply show up on a Tuesday ready to fill out paperwork so their child can start school on the first day of school, like big brother in second grade.  Of course there is room for their child.  The school district doesn’t turn anyone away, they just make it work.  It doesn’t matter if the program is a good fit, it is on the way to the elementary school and they have seen your bus during pickup time, so can you get Jimmie in the afternoon, too?

    My favorite type of August/September enrollment is the family we have had on the waiting list, who was on the books, has paid the fees, and come by with their child before the school year starts to help the child feel at home in your center.  Sometimes families are enrolled, but don’t come by between the tour and start date, but we have had communication between times, and have solidified their spot in our records.  I am good with them too.  There can also be those who are on your list, have filled out forms, but not paid or responded to emails or phone calls.  They make me nervous, but I have them pencilled in to the class roster.

    All of these families are responding to the societal norms that school starts at X time.  That is when their child will start.  I have been baffled by parents of infants waiting until late August to enroll their child, when they returned to work in June, but different strokes for different folks.  I presume they are also the type to not wear white for half of the year. I can live with that.  Most teachers and directors know this enrollment shift.  They plan for it and have events, crafts, or lesson plans adjusted for this period of transition.  By the time October rolls around everyone presumes the classes are pretty solid.  This is what our school will look like this year.  Cool.

    Second Shift

    But no school has had 100% the same student body at the end of the school year that they had at the beginning.  When we’re in it, it seams like folks just trickle in and out.  From the outside, I can tell you, you are missing something.

    Here is the thing, the first 60 days of enrollment are key to cementing a relationship.  It is like dating.  You agreed to be in this thing together and at first you are learning about the other person and it is exciting.  Then you discover they eat tacos like a heathen.  You get to decide if you can live with that.  Will you just stop eating tacos?  Will you talk to them about the different ways to consume this wonderful food without having to take a hose to the area afterwards?  Will you decide this is a deal breaker?  You have choices.  So do the parents.

    During those 60 days the parents find out that no sick kids, means they can’t give their son Tylenol and bring him in.  They learned that you were closed on Columbus Day, when else is the school closed?!?  Their child may have gotten sick or injured and you didn’t handle it exactly how they thought it should be handled.  You found out they want texts every time their child eats.  The teacher is concerned that the child came in the same clothes they went home in last night.  The child is super into rough housing and her teacher doesn’t know how to handle it.  So there are thoughts of breaking up.

    The Director starts getting calls from parents who are, “just getting information for a friend.”  Children disappear for half a day with no explanation (they are trying out another school).  Dads drop in unannounced on lunch breaks, both enrolled and touring.  Moms come by at 4pm to just hang out.  Parents bring friends and family members with them at pick up or drop off.  These are signs of shopping.  Some are signs that they love your program and want to make sure they aren’t missing anything before referring you to their friends who are unhappy at their school, and others are signs that they are unhappy with you, and looking to move.

    So if a child enrolls on August 22, 2016 (first day of school in the district I grew up in), 2 months later is October 22nd.  Do you think the parents want to change schools right before Halloween?  Then come Thanksgiving and Christmas.  Families generally wait to actually make the change until January.  Some move sooner, but most wait.  But they are shopping in October, November and December.  Are you marketing to them?

    The Third Shift

    Some folks held out thought the January shift thinking things would get better after all the holidays and excitement of the new school year were over, and are still unhappy and move in the spring, but not many.  Those have a  lot of loyalty and will be a great addition to your school if you are a good match.

    The last large shift happens at the end of the school year.  This is not a surprise to any teacher or director.  We have seen it many times.  Families pull out in June to have Cousin Susie watch the kids.  They shift to part-time because that works better over the summer.  New families enroll for summer activities. Three year olds are enrolled so they will be settled in for their pre-school school year.

    The spring is spent in planning summer programs, going to the area schools, and talking to your existing clients about all the fun stuff you will be doing over the summer, if you stay open.  For many centers this is a period of dormancy, where they close or reduce staff for the summer, so the spring is the time to nail down enrollment for the coming year.  Because a mass exodus can be such a blow to the budget, few Directors fail to plan for this shift more than once.  One lean summer is a powerful reminder of the need to get ready for the summer enrollment change.  On the other hand a super full summer with a budget cushion built is a fabulous way to go into the fall.

    So, How do I prepare?

    I though you would never ask.  You start marketing 2-3 months before the shift is expected.  If you aren’t marketing your summer program before Spring Break, you are behind.  Many programs know that, but almost no one is marketing their school in October, November and December.  That means you will have less competition.

    Step 1 Start with checking in with all of your newly enrolled families.  Schedule a time with each of them to visit.  See how they are liking the school.  What questions do they have?  Is there a way to get them involved on a project?  If you can get them involved in planning the Halloween festivities, you might cement the relationship.  Having them survey the parents in their class about what day would be best for a parent’s night out in November and December is a way to get them involved and remind them of your additional services to help busy families.

    Step 2 Once you have confidence that you have strengthened your relationships with the new families, take what you learned from them about what they particularly like about your center, and figure out what you should highlight for prospects.  Knowing what is resonating with your ideal client right now is important.

    Step 3 Develop a marketing plan.  Assess your most recent marketing plan.  Does it take advantage of the social media networks that you ideal client uses?  Are you sending newsletters out to parents who have toured and/or inquired over the past 12 months?  If blogging is more your style, set up a blog on your website and use that as the basis for your social media and/or newsletter.

    Step 4 Set up a system to track all calls and tours and make sure that you follow up with them to get the desired 6-12 contacts with each client.

    Step 4 Enroll.

    Enrollment Surge 2016

    If you want help putting all this together, I have good news!  We will be working with Directors to develop customized marketing plans to take advantage of the second surge in enrollment.  Together we will make 2017 the year of the full classroom!!!

    The Enrollment Surge Class starts October 28th.  You can use Halloween as your kick off event for your second surge.  Set up your marketing, events and program to bring in the RIGHT families for the new year without breaking a sweat!

    Join us for a four week intensive to maximize the upcoming enrollment period. 

    You will learn from Kate and Carrie, who have been in your shoes and worked to get full programs with waiting list following this program.  When we have offered this class in the past all the programs met their enrollment goals.  Click the link below and join us for this 4 week class.

    sign-me-up


  • 19 Sep 2016 6:58 PM | Carrie Casey (Administrator)

    It’s enjoyable when your life is progressing. Like losing weight or increasing your nest egg, getting a promotion can be gratifying. The key is to prove that you deserve a promotion and are the right person for the job. With a little planning, you can get a promotion and advance your career.

    Even if you’ve been stuck in the same job for years, it’s never too late to make new career strides. You can quickly establish yourself as a valuable employee that deserves greater responsibilities.  Do you want to be a lead teacher, curriculum specialist, trainer, or director?  You can!

    Get a promotion and revitalize your career:

    1. Work at a school where promotions are possible. For example, if you work for a small center with a long-term teachers, there will be few opportunities for promotion. So, your first step might be to find a new center! Ideally, it would be a large company with multiple locations. If your center has room to grow, stretch your wings there.
    2. Start each day with a plan. Most employees arrive at work, grab a cup of coffee, socialize for a while, and then try to figure out what to do. Have a plan before you go to bed. With a plan, when you get up, you can start your day effectively and get a head start on the competition.
    3. Go above and beyond. Does everyone else arrive at 8:00am and leave by 5:00pm? Then you arrive at 7:30 and leave at 5:30. It doesn’t take long for people to identify you as the person that comes in early and leaves late.Find a way to stand out as a superior employee. It isn’t hard since most others are just doing enough to avoid getting fired.
    4. Always be early. Be early to work and early with your work. If something is due by Friday at 5:00, have it completed on Thursday. Be 100% reliable. And be on time for meetings. Avoid letting anyone down. Be impeccable with your word.
    5. Avoid making enemies. You never know whom your archenemy knows. You both might be low on the totem pole but your nemesis might be best friends with the boss’s daughter. Be one of those people that everyone likes and admires. It’s not hard to be pleasant when a promotion is at stake.
    6. Be indispensable. There are certain people that your school can’t do without. You probably know a few of them. What can you do to be so valuable that the owner or board will try to keep you happy? One key to getting a better job is being important enough that the company won’t want to disappoint you.
    7. Identify the important people. Where is your promotion likely to be? Whom would you work for? Start making friends and prove your worth. Specifically ask about the position and what qualities they need in an employee.  Begin developing and advertising the skills necessary to be successful.
    8. Speak to your boss and any other managers. Let them know that you’d like to take on a new role in the near future. You’ll be viewed favorably for showing initiative and you’ll be on their radar. Being proactive shows that you’re willing to take on greater responsibilities.
    9. Get the training you need. If you want to be a Director, or Assistant Director, Get your Director Credential.  Texas Director can help you get your credential in less than a month.  If you want to be a trainer, take a train the trainer class.

    Keep your ear to the ground to know of upcoming openings. You can even suggest a new position be created that’s perfect for your backgrounds, skills, and interests.  Perhaps you can step into the new role for 2 hours a day, and stay teaching the rest of the time.  Be a creative problem solver!

    Most employees aren’t willing to earn a promotion. You have much less competition than you think. However, if your best efforts fail, it might be time to look to another company. The perfect promotion for you already exists somewhere. The disadvantage of staying with the same company is fewer opportunities. Weigh your options and enjoy!


(c) 2002-2017 ALL TEXAS DIRECTOR - TexasDirector

Mailing Address:  1000 Purple Martin Drive, Pflugerville, TX  78660

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software